NPR: Herman Wouk, ‘The Jackie Robinson Of Jewish-American Fiction,’ Dies At 103

May 17, 2019 12:25 PM ET
ROSE FRIEDMAN

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Herman Wouk has died. Wouk was famous for his sprawling World War II novels, including The Winds of War and War and Remembrance, and for his portrayal of Jewish Americans in the novel Marjorie Morningstar. He died in his sleep Friday at his home in Palm Springs, Calif., at age 103.

Many people might remember Wouk for a certain incident involving strawberries in The Caine Mutiny, which became a film in 1954. After having a breakdown at sea, the tyrannical Captain Queeg accuses his crew of stealing a quart of strawberries and becomes obsessed with finding the culprit.

Humphrey Bogart played Queeg in the film, but he wasn’t exactly what Wouk had in mind when he wrote the character. In the book, Wouk described the captain as “a small man” with “strands of sandy hair across an almost bald head.” In 2004, the author told NPR, “Now Captain Queeg is Humphrey Bogart. There’s nothing you can do about it, and I’m perfectly content with [it.] That was one of the great performances, I think, of his career.”

 

Summary
Herman Wouk, 'The Jackie Robinson Of Jewish-American Fiction,' Dies At 103
Article Name
Herman Wouk, 'The Jackie Robinson Of Jewish-American Fiction,' Dies At 103
Description
Wouk was famous for his sprawling World War II novels, including The Winds of War and War and Remembrance, and for his portrayal of Jewish Americans in the novel Marjorie Morningstar.