AP: Mother Russia: South Florida sees a boom in ‘birth tourism’

In this photo taken on Jan. 24, 2019, Denis Wolok, the father of 1-month-old Eva's father, shows the child's U.S. passport during an interview with The Associated Press in Hollywood, Fla. Every year, hundreds of pregnant Russian women, like Wolok's wife, Olga Zemlyanaya, travel to the United States to give birth so that their child can acquire all the privileges of American citizenship. (AP Photo/Iuliia Stashevska)

March 22, 2019
IULIIA STASHEVSKA

In this photo taken on Jan. 24, 2019, Olga Zemlyanaya, an interior design blogger, holds her 1-month-old daughter Eva in Hollywood, Fla. Zemlyanaya, who gave birth to a daughter in December, was remaining in Miami until her child is issued a passport. “With $30,000 we would not be able to buy an apartment for our child or do anything, really. But we could give her freedom. That’s actually really cool.” (AP Photo/Iuliia Stashevska)
In this photo taken Jan 19, 2019, Svetlana Mokerova, a fitness instructor, speaks to a doctor in Miami Beach, Fla. “We did not have a very clear understanding about all the benefits” of an American passport, she said. “We just knew that it was something awesome.” (AP Photo/Iuliia Stashevska)
In this photo taken Jan. 24, 2019, Olga Zemlyanaya, an interior design blogger holds her 1-month-old daughter Eva in Hollywood, Fla. Every year, hundreds of pregnant Russian women, like Zemlyanaya, travel to the United States to give birth so that their child can acquire all the privileges of American citizenship. (AP Photo/Iuliia Stashevska)
In this photo taken on Jan. 21, 2019, people walk past a lifeguard booth painted in the colors of an American flag on a beach in Miami Beach, Fla. The Miami area is popular among Russians not only for its tropical weather but also because of the large Russian-speaking population. Sunny Isles Beach, a city just north of Miami, is even nicknamed “Little Moscow”. (AP Photo/Iuliia Stashevska)

MIAMI (AP) — Every year, hundreds of pregnant Russian women travel to the United States to give birth so that their child can acquire all the privileges of American citizenship.

They pay anywhere from $20,000 to sometimes more than $50,000 to brokers who arrange their travel documents, accommodations and hospital stays, often in Florida.

While the cost is high, their children will be rewarded with opportunities and travel advantages not available to their Russian countrymen. The parents themselves may benefit someday as well.

And the decidedly un-Russian climate in South Florida and the posh treatment they receive in the maternity wards — unlike dismal clinics back home — can ease the financial sting and make the practice seem more like an extended vacation.

The Russians are part of a wave of “birth tourists” that includes sizable numbers of women from China and Nigeria.

President Donald Trump has spoken out against the provision in the U.S. Constitution that allows “birthright citizenship” and has vowed to end it, although legal experts are divided on whether he can actually do that.

Although there have been scattered cases of authorities arresting operators of birth tourism agencies for visa fraud or tax evasion, coming to the U.S. to give birth is fundamentally legal. Russians interviewed by The Associated Press said they were honest about their intentions when applying for visas and even showed signed contracts with doctors and hospitals.

In this photo taken on Jan 19, 2019, a doctor performs an ultrasound examination for Svetlana Mokerova in Miami Beach, Fla. Every year, hundreds of pregnant Russian women, like Mokerova, travel to the United States to give birth so that their child can acquire the privileges of American citizenship. (AP Photo/Iuliia Stashevska)

There are no figures on how many foreign women travel to the U.S. specifically to give birth. The Center for Immigration Studies, a group that advocates for stricter immigration laws, estimated that in 2012, about 36,000 foreign-born women gave birth in the U.S., then left the country.

The Russian contingent is clearly large. Anton Yachmenev of the Miami Care company that arranges such trips, told the AP that about 150 Russian families a year use his service, and that there are about 30 such companies just in the area.

South Florida is popular among Russians not only for its tropical weather but also because of the large Russian-speaking population. Sunny Isles Beach, a city just north of Miami, is even nicknamed “Little Moscow.”

“With $30,000, we would not be able to buy an apartment for our child or do anything, really. But we could give her freedom. That’s actually really cool,” said Olga Zemlyanaya, who gave birth to a daughter in December and was staying in South Florida until her child got a U.S. passport.

An American passport confers many advantages. Once the child turns 21, he or she can apply for “green card” immigration status for the parents.

A U.S. passport also gives the holder more travel opportunities than a Russian one; Americans can make short-term trips to more than 180 countries without a visa, while Russians can go visa-free only to about 80.

Traveling to the U.S. on a Russian passport often requires a laborious interview process for a visa. Just getting an appointment for the interview can take months.

Some Russians fear that travel opportunities could diminish as tensions grow between Moscow and the West, or that Russia might even revert to stricter Soviet-era rules for leaving the country.

“Seeing the conflict growing makes people want to take precautions because the country might well close its borders. And if that happens, one would at least have a passport of a different country and be able to leave,” said Ilya Zhegulev, a journalist for the Latvia-based Russian website Meduza that is sharply critical of the Kremlin.

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Mother Russia: South Florida sees a boom in ‘birth tourism’
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Mother Russia: South Florida sees a boom in ‘birth tourism’
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Every year, hundreds of pregnant Russian women travel to the United States to give birth so that their child can acquire all the privileges of American citizenship.