Archives of two giants of economics donated to UChicago Library

Papers of George Stigler, Harry G. Johnson to deepen understanding of field-defining research

The papers of former UChicago scholar and Nobel laureate George Stigler, PhD’38, are now part of the UChicago Library’s archives. Prof. Stephen Stigler said he donated his father’s papers because “the University of Chicago was such an important part of my father’s life.” Courtesy of Special Collections Research Center

Oct 25, 2018
Rachel Rosenberg

The University of Chicago has a long history of field-defining scholarship in economics. Thirty scholars affiliated with the University have won Nobel Prizes for their groundbreaking research in economics—ranging from the study of society to the intersection of law and economics.

Recent gifts to the University of Chicago Library, including the papers of Nobel laureate George Stigler, PhD’38, and international trade expert Harry G. Johnson, will expand scholars’ understanding of the legacy of the Chicago school of economics and the ways in which UChicago scholars shape the field on a global scale.

With these new gifts, the UChicago Library is now home to collections of more than 30 economists and 21 Nobel laureates, including seven Nobel Prize-winning economists: Gary Becker, Ronald Coase, Robert Fogel, Milton Friedman, Merton Miller, Theodore Schultz and George Stigler.

“These generous new gifts will enable scholars to explore the history of economics in new ways,” said Brenda Johnson, Library Director and University Librarian. “They strengthen our University Archives and demonstrate the Library’s ongoing commitment to being a vital center of University of Chicago history and the home of Nobel Prize winners’ research.”

Summary
Archives of two giants of economics donated to UChicago Library
Article Name
Archives of two giants of economics donated to UChicago Library
Description
Frequently thought of as one of the leaders of the Chicago school of economics, Stigler, PhD’38, came to UChicago as a graduate student in 1933, and returned to Chicago as a professor from 1958 until his death in 1991.