NPR: Why Inmates Set Free After The Indonesia Quake Are Returning To Their Prison

The Donggala District Prison was torched by rioting prisoners one day after the double earthquake and tsunami disasters on Sept. 28. Donggala is close to the epicenter of the earthquake, and rattled prisoners wanted a way out. Noele Mage/NPR

October 10, 20183:34 PM ET
JULIE MCCARTHY

It’s not every day you see freed prisoners walk back into the arms of their jailers. But about 80 inmates from Indonesia’s Donggala District Prison are doing just that.

They assembled this past week on the patchy grass of the prison grounds and counted off for prison head Safiuddin.

The diminutive warden’s powers of persuasion worked for this group, but not for all of the 360 prisoners who had been serving time in the old jailhouse when an earthquake and tsunami hit Indonesia on Sept. 28.

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Why Inmates Set Free After The Indonesia Quake Are Returning To Their Prison
Article Name
Why Inmates Set Free After The Indonesia Quake Are Returning To Their Prison
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It's not every day you see freed prisoners walk back into the arms of their jailers. But about 80 inmates from Indonesia's Donggala District Prison are doing just that.