Krannert Art Museum summer exhibition, events sharpen focus on photography

“Capturing Landscape,” a summer photography exhibition at Krannert Art Museum, looks at American landscape photography and the relationship between people and nature. Wynn Bullock, “The Shore,” 1966. Gelatin silver print. Museum purchase 1967-14-2 © Wynn Bullock Courtesy Krannert Art Museum

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — A summer photography exhibition at Krannert Art Museum provides a way to experience American landscape photography, with accompanying events that feature well-known local photographers and encourage visitors to create landscape photographs of their own.

Capturing Landscape” looks at the relationship between people and nature through black-and-white photographs from the Krannert Art Museum collection. The exhibition runs May 26 to Oct. 20, with public talks and workshops planned in July and August.

The works by modern and contemporary Americans represent landscape photography in a variety of ways.

“As you walk through the exhibition, the range of photographs will encourage you to question our relationship with nature and how that relationship has evolved over time, for better or worse, and to see just how much impact we’ve had on that change,” said Kathryn Koca Polite, the exhibition curator.

Art Sinsabaugh, “Midwest Landscape #74,” edition 1 of 3, 20th century. Gelatin silver print on paper. Museum purchase through the Art Acquisition Fund 1979-1-1.
Courtesy Krannert Art Museum

The photographs are loosely organized thematically according to the photographers’ interpretations of the landscape or cityscape. Human intervention into the natural landscape and the encroachment of industry appears in Richard Meisinger’s smokestacks towering over a residential neighborhood, while Charles Traub presents a wind turbine rising behind a cornfield.

Many works in the exhibition highlight Midwestern landscapes, such as a barn in a central Illinois field by Robbert Flick, panoramic views of the Midwest by former U. of I. professor Art Sinsabaugh, and a Wisconsin pasture by Paul Vanderbilt. Other photographs close in on details in the landscape, so much so that the images become abstracted – for example, Harry Callahan’s photos of grasses and water that play with light, shadow and reflection.

The earliest works in the exhibition are Walker Evans’ 1929 images documenting the growth of urban New York City with iconic images of skyscrapers and the Brooklyn Bridge. By contrast, some of the most contemporary photographs in the exhibition show how people impose borders on the landscape, such as Alan Cohen’s photos of national and state borders featuring a close-up of the border wall between the U.S. and Mexico.

Editor’s note:   More information about the exhibition and related programs can be found online at https://kam.illinois.edu/exhibition/capturing-landscape or by contacting Julia Kelly at jkell@illinois.edu.

Source: Illinois NEWS BUREAU

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Krannert Art Museum summer exhibition, events sharpen focus on photography
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Krannert Art Museum summer exhibition, events sharpen focus on photography
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CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — A summer photography exhibition at Krannert Art Museum provides a way to experience American landscape photography, with accompanying events that feature well-known local photographers and encourage visitors to create landscape photographs of their own.