What to look for in an apartment

All your life, you have been neglected, you were always the one who was picked last at the playground, you never really stood up in the crowd. If you ever feel unwanted, worry no more, since ‘tis the time for apartment leases. As you can see in the websites, there are so many places that want you! (well technically your money but let’s not talk about that)

I have lived in two university housing facilities (not supposed to say `dorms’) and four different apartments during my stay here in the University. I have been here since 2011, while taking two years off for the military. I have witnessed the dramatic change of the apartment scene on campus shifting from small houses to skyscrapers with amazing amenities. It is an interesting shift, and the apartment market seems to be booming, with new apartments getting built every year. It is a rather pleasant situation for us consumers.

Currently, the students are met with a diversity of living options, from luxury apartments to cell-type efficiencies with no laundry. In this overwhelming era, how does one look for an apartment?

Like everything in life, priority is important. There is a lot that goes into one’s decision of a place to live – budget, location, amenities, room size, room type, whether to have roommates, whether to have pets, and so on.

This is why you need to prioritize. There’s probably one option where you don’t have to prioritize, which is when you have a rather generous budget. Then, I think you can choose to lease with one of our sponsors (309 and others) and you’ll be well off.

But if you’re like me and have to live off of $1,500 a year and eat five meals a day, you have to make compromises. In my experience, the two things you can compromise is location and room type.

This really depends on how much you’re willing to leave luxury for later on in life. For example, you can choose to live in a 3 bedroom and 1 bath apartment on campus (near county) and pay less than 500 a month. Of course you’d have to wish for roommates that have good aim and use all-in-one washers.

Or, you can choose to live in a nicer apartment, nice amenities, but a bit away from campus (like our other sponsors, Capstone and Village). This will bring the rent still lower than 500 dollars, but commuting may be a pain (there are direct and frequent bus routes, though). If you own a car and really want to save on rent, you can look at different houses and apartments that can go as low as high 200s with roommates.

In my experience, other important things to consider are the following:

Management and leasing procedure (maintenance prompt enough? Non-sketchy procedures? Do you need a social security? Deposit?)

Included utilities/facilities (laundry? Furnished? Internet? Water? Garbage? You’ll be surprised things they can charge you for)

Move-in dates (early move in possible? Gap between previous lease?)

Neighborhood (loud? Safe? Secured perimeters?)

It is a complicated game we play, this apartment hunting. Having so many options is both a blessing and a curse. However, as people away from home trying to find home, it’s nice to feel that we (our money) are welcome here.

Jin Whan Bae/ Reporter

 

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What to look for in an apartment
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What to look for in an apartment
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All your life, you have been neglected, you were always the one who was picked last at the playground, you never really stood up in the crowd. If you ever feel unwanted, worry no more, since ‘tis the time for apartment leases. As you can see in the websites, there are so many places that want you! (well technically your money but let’s not talk about that)
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